Jet Lag

How to beat it?

Being jetlagged means feeling tired, headache, stomach upset, moody and with appetite disorders. This happen when we cross few time zones and our body is facing the challenge to adjust to the new time zone. The further you go, the longer it will take to get back in sync. Time of recovery is generally one time zone per day, means one hour per day. Our circadian rhythm is determinate by the light, and it is responsible for the alertness and the rest of our body. Also, the direction of travel has an influence in our jet lag. If you fly east (the beast) is far more difficult for the body to adjust because you are going towards the sunrise, which will happen earlier than the time you are used at home. The sensation is like you wake up at 4 am (your body time) and outside the sun is shining and the local time is 1 pm.  If you go towards west (the best) Sunrise is actually later compare to home, and if you wake up early in the morning local time, your body clock is set to a later time and you feel less fatigued.  

Even though private jets have all the comfort also in terms of cozy beds, jet lag still needs to be treated even after a long sleep on board. Nowadays technology on board of business jets includes a humidifier system that make the air on board less dry. This have a huge and positive impact on the quality of the air you breath, and makes you feel less fatigued even after a long haul flight. Hydration is also very important, as you lose the equivalent of one glass of water per hour during flight.

What can we do to minimize the effects of jet lag?

Before your trip, calculate how much you'll need to adjust your sleep and wake times to be in sync with the local time at destination. Allow yourself enough time and do it gently. The aim of this exercise is to get your body used to the new time zone before you actually live it.

Not easy at all, but If you manage to stay awake for a prolonged period, no matter what time zone you're in. This will generate a very heavy need of sleep, and this may help to prevent some of the issues related to an unbalanced circadian rhythm.

Prepare your bedroom properly. Temperature shouldn’t be too hot, better a little chill. Get some water ready and pull curtains all the way to get the darkness. Consider also to use some earplugs for more quietness.

Private jets are equipped with proper beds and the lightening on board can be reduced all the way to darkness. Plus, a good rest in a horizontal position is priceless…

When dealing with jet-lag, the “home remedies” can help: a cup of chamomile or tea, or a thought-out-timed nap (no longer than 20 minutes, though, or you’ll end up more fatigued than before). If you can, avoid driving when you're feeling sleepy, especially if you rented a car (unfamiliar) and moving through a new territory.

A low dose of melatonin taken several hours before your desired bedtime may help align your circadian rhythm to the new time zone faster, while and higher dose will make you sleep, if taken at bedtime. Private jets are equipped also with a stock of general medication however, you can take on board any other cure you need.

Natural or electric light is the most important factor in resetting your body clock is light. If you can, get 15 to 30 minutes of direct sunlight as soon as you wake up. Go for a walk, eat breakfast outside, or just sit in the sun and read.

If you plan to stay away from home for a short period of time, try not to adjust onto the new time zone, as by the time you will acclimatize, it’s time to go back and you will have to start all over again.

Take light meals. As your stomach may be upside-down, don’t over weight it with a lot or too heavy food. You might face the situation that it’s breakfast time in the local time, but your body is asking for a dinner, instead. On board a private jet, you can plan ahead your meals and order exactly what you want. The crew will take care of the shopping and will ensure you are served with the freshest products available.